GAFÉIAS Inspiring Personalities

 

 

ROMAN EMPIRE

 

 

Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus Augustus
Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus Augustus

Imperator Caesar Traianus Hadrianus Augustus

 

Hadrian (Latin: Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus Augustus[1][2][3] 24 January 76 – 10 July 138), was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. He is best known for building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. In Rome, he re-built the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma. In addition to being emperor, Hadrian was a humanist and was philhellene in all his tastes.[citation needed] He was the third of the so-called Five Good Emperors.

 

Hadrian was born Publius Aelius Hadrianus to an ethnically Italian family, either in Italica near Seville, in today´s Spain, or in Rome. His predecessor Trajan, also Hispanic himself, was a maternal cousin of Hadrian's father.[4] Trajan never officially designated an heir, but according to his wife Pompeia Plotina, Trajan named Hadrian emperor immediately before his death. Trajan's wife and his friend Licinius Sura were well-disposed towards Hadrian, and he may well have owed his succession to them.[5]

 

During his reign, Hadrian traveled to nearly every province of the Empire. An ardent admirer of Greece, he sought to make Athens the cultural capital of the Empire and ordered the construction of many opulent temples in the city. He used his relationship with his Greek favorite Antinous to underline his philhellenism and led to the creation of one of the most popular cults of ancient times. He spent extensive amounts of his time with the military; he usually wore military attire and even dined and slept amongst the soldiers. He ordered military training and drilling to be more rigorous and even made use of false reports of attack to keep the army alert.

 

Upon his accession to the throne, Hadrian withdrew from Trajan's conquests in Mesopotamia and Armenia, and even considered abandoning Dacia. Late in his reign he suppressed the Bar Kokhba revolt in Judaea, renaming the province Syria Palaestina. In 136 an ailing Hadrian adopted Lucius Aelius as his heir, but the latter died suddenly two years later. In 138, Hadrian resolved to adopt Antoninus Pius if he would in turn adopt Marcus Aurelius and Aelius' son Lucius Verus as his own eventual successors. Antoninus agreed, and soon afterward Hadrian died at Baiae.[6]

 

Image, Source 1   Source 2

Source:  →  (full article)

 

Thorsten Opper’s book “Hadrian: Empire and Conflict":

While striving to put forward a balanced view, the historian cannot help giving a lyrical ring to his most matter-of-fact statements: “For almost twenty-one years, from A.D. 117 to 138, Publius Aelius Hadrianus ruled one of the mightiest empires the world has ever seen” is the opening sentence to Opper’s introduction, which chirpily explains that “at the heart of the empire was Rome, the largest city of the ancient Mediterranean, if not the globe, a pulsating capital of one million inhabitants.”

Coming to Hadrian, the author goes on: “The empire needed to gain strength and cohesion in order to be able to face the many threats to its prosperity and peaceful existence. Hadrian’s achievements in these areas were outstanding, his legacy immense.”

 

Source:  →  (full article)

 

 

 

 

Antinous (Louvre)
Antinous (Louvre)

Antinous

 

Antinous (Ancient Greek: Ἀντίνοος, Antinoös) (27 November, c. 111 – before 30 October 130[1]) was a Bithynian youth and a favourite of the Roman emperor Hadrian.[2] He was deified after his death, although his exact status in the Roman pantheon was uncertain.[3]

Antinoüs, or Antinoös, with a diaeresis, is the hypercorrect spelling of his name.

 

Cassius Dio (c.164-post 229) (The section of his Roman History covering Hadrian's reign is known only from the 11th century epitome by Xiphilinus) 69.11.2-4:

 

"Antinous was from Bithynium, a Bithynian city which we also call Claudiopolis, and he had become Hadrian's boy-favourite (paidika); and he died in Egypt, either by falling into the Nile, as Hadrian writes [lost], or, as the truth is, having been offered in sacrifice (hierourgethesis). For Hadrian was in any case, as I have said, very keen on the curious arts, and made use of divinations and incantations of all kinds. Thus Hadrian honoured Antinous - either on account of his love for him, or because the youth had voluntarily undertaken to die for him (ethelontes ethanatothe) (for there was need for a life to be surrendered willingly, to achieve what Hadrian intended), by founding a city on the spot where he suffered this fate and naming it after him [Antinoöpolis; modern El Sheik'ibada]. He also set up statues of him, or rather sacred images, practically all over the world."

 

Source:  →  (full article)

 

Image, Source: Bust of Antinoos from Villa Hadriana in Tivoli. Now in Louvre.

 

 

 

 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

 

 

Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln

 

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) was the 16th President of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through its greatest constitutional, military, and moral crises—the American Civil War—preserving the Union, abolishing slavery, strengthening the national government and modernizing the economy. Reared in a poor family on the western frontier, Lincoln was self-educated, and became a country lawyer, a Whig Party leader, Illinois state legislator during the 1830s, and a one-term member of the United States House of Representatives during the 1840s.

After a series of debates in 1858 that gave national visibility to his opposition to the expansion of slavery, Lincoln lost a Senate race to his arch-rival, Stephen A. Douglas. Lincoln, a moderate from a swing state, secured the Republican Party presidential nomination in 1860. With almost no support in the South, Lincoln swept the North and was elected president in 1860. His election was the signal for seven southern slave states to declare their secession from the Union and form the Confederacy. The departure of the Southerners gave Lincoln's party firm control of Congress, but no formula for compromise or reconciliation was found. Lincoln explained in his second inaugural address: "Both parties deprecated war, but one of them would make war rather than let the Nation survive, and the other would accept war rather than let it perish, and the war came."

When the North enthusiastically rallied behind the national flag after the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861, Lincoln concentrated on the military and political dimensions of the war effort. His goal was now to reunite the nation. As the South was in a state of insurrection, Lincoln exercised his authority to suspend habeas corpus, arresting and temporarily detaining thousands of suspected secessionists without trial. Lincoln averted British recognition of the Confederacy by skillfully handling the Trent affair in late 1861. His efforts toward the abolition of slavery include issuing his Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, encouraging the border states to outlaw slavery, and helping push through Congress the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which finally freed all the slaves nationwide in December 1865. Lincoln closely supervised the war effort, especially the selection of top generals, including commanding general Ulysses S. Grant. Lincoln brought leaders of the major factions of his party into his cabinet and pressured them to cooperate. Under Lincoln's leadership, the Union set up a naval blockade that shut down the South's normal trade, took control of the border slave states at the start of the war, gained control of communications with gunboats on the southern river systems, and tried repeatedly to capture the Confederate capital at Richmond, Virginia. Each time a general failed, Lincoln substituted another until finally Grant succeeded in 1865.

An exceptionally astute politician deeply involved with power issues in each state, Lincoln reached out to War Democrats and managed his own re-election in the 1864 presidential election. As the leader of the moderate faction of the Republican party, Lincoln found his policies and personality were "blasted from all sides": Radical Republicans demanded harsher treatment of the South, War Democrats desired more compromise, Copperheads despised him, and irreconcilable secessionists plotted his death.[1] Politically, Lincoln fought back with patronage, by pitting his opponents against each other, and by appealing to the American people with his powers of oratory.[2] His Gettysburg Address of 1863 became the most quoted speech in American history. It was an iconic statement of America's dedication to the principles of nationalism, republicanism, equal rights, liberty, and democracy.[3] At the close of the war, Lincoln held a moderate view of Reconstruction, seeking to reunite the nation speedily through a policy of generous reconciliation in the face of lingering and bitter divisiveness. Six days after the surrender of Confederate commanding general Robert E. Lee, however, Lincoln was assassinated by actor and Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth. Lincoln's death was the first assassination of a U.S. president and sent the nation into mourning. Lincoln has been consistently ranked by scholars and the public as one of the three greatest U.S. presidents.

 

Source:  →  (full article)

 

Image, Source: Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President of the United States,  8. November 1863.

 

 

 

AUSTRIA

 

 

© Büro Dr. Helmut Zilk, für AEIOU
© Büro Dr. Helmut Zilk, für AEIOU

Helmut Zilk

 

(June 9, 1927, Favoriten — October 24, 2008) was an Austrian journalist and politician in one of the leading democratic parties of the Austrian Republic.

 

Zilk was Mayor of Vienna from 1984 to 1994. In December 1993 he was severely injured when he opened a letter bomb which had been sent to his home in Innere Stadt by Franz Fuchs.

 

Zilk died on October 24, 2008 of heart failure, after arriving home sick from a vacation in Portugal. He was married to Austrian musical star, Dagmar Koller. Source:  →  (full article)

 

 

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Emanda Cafe Mekelle, Tigray, Ethiopia © A. Andiel 2011
Emanda Cafe Mekelle, Tigray, Ethiopia © A. Andiel 2011
Emanda Cafe Mekelle, Tigray, Ethiopia © A. Andiel 2011
Emanda Cafe Mekelle, Tigray, Ethiopia © A. Andiel 2011
Emanda Cafe Mekelle, Tigray, Ethiopia © A. Andiel 2011
Emanda Cafe Mekelle, Tigray, Ethiopia © A. Andiel 2011
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